Journal cover Journal topic
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 875-883, 2016
http://www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/16/875/2016/
doi:10.5194/nhess-16-875-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
01 Apr 2016
Hazard mapping related to structurally controlled landslides in Southern Leyte, Philippines
Paul Kenneth Luzon1,2, Kristina Montalbo1,2, Jam Galang1,2, Jasmine May Sabado1,2, Carmille Marie Escape1,2, Raquel Felix1,2, and Alfredo Mahar Francisco Lagmay1,2 1National Institute of Geological Sciences, University of the Philippines, C. P. Garcia corner Velasquez street, U. P. Diliman, 1101 Quezon City, Philippines
2Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards, Department of Science and Technology, Quezon City, Metro Manila, NCR, Philippines
Abstract. The 2006 Guinsaugon landslide in Saint Bernard, Southern Leyte, is one of the largest known landslides in the Philippines in recent history. It consists of a 15–20 million m3 rockslide-debris avalanche from an approximately 675 m high mountain weakened by continuous movement of the Philippine Fault. The catastrophic Guinsaugon landslide killed 1221 people and displaced 19 000 residents over its 4.5 km path. To investigate the present-day morphology of the scar and potential failure that may occur, analysis of a 5 m resolution InSAR-derived digital elevation model was conducted using Coltop3D and Matterocking software, leading to the generation of a landslide hazard map for the province of Southern Leyte in central Philippines. The dip and dip direction of discontinuity sets that contribute to gravitational failure in mountainous areas of the province were identified and measured using a lower Schmidt–Lambert color scheme. After measurement of the morpho-structural orientations, potential sites of failure were analyzed. Conefall was then utilized to compute the extent of rock mass runout. Results of the analysis show instability in the scarp area of the 2006 Guinsaugon landslide and in adjacent slopes because of the presence of steep discontinuities that range from 45 to 60°. Apart from the 2006 Guinsaugon landslide site, runout models simulated farther rock mass extent in its adjacent slopes, revealing a high potential for fatal landslides to happen in the municipality of Saint Bernard. Concerned agencies may use maps produced in the same manner as this study to identify possible sites where structurally controlled landslides can occur. In a country like the Philippines, where fractures and faults are common, this type of simulated hazard maps would be useful for disaster prevention and facilitate disaster risk reduction efforts for landslide-susceptible areas.

Citation: Luzon, P. K., Montalbo, K., Galang, J., Sabado, J. M., Escape, C. M., Felix, R., and Lagmay, A. M. F.: Hazard mapping related to structurally controlled landslides in Southern Leyte, Philippines, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 875-883, doi:10.5194/nhess-16-875-2016, 2016.
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Short summary
To investigate the present-day morphology of the 2006 Guinsaugon landslide scar and potential failure that may occur, analysis of a 5 m resolution IfSAR-derived DTM was conducted using Coltop3D and Matterocking software to produce a structurally controlled landslide hazard map for Southern Leyte, Philippines. This type of simulated hazard maps would be useful for disaster prevention and to facilitate disaster risk reduction efforts for landslide-susceptible areas in the country.
To investigate the present-day morphology of the 2006 Guinsaugon landslide scar and potential...
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