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Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 1599-1616, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-1599-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
12 Jun 2018
Learning in an interactive simulation tool against landslide risks: the role of strength and availability of experiential feedback
Pratik Chaturvedi1,2, Akshit Arora1,3, and Varun Dutt1 1Applied Cognitive Science Laboratory, Indian Institute of Technology, Mandi 175005, India
2Defence Terrain Research Laboratory, Defence Research and Development Organization, Delhi 110054, India
3Computer Science and Engineering Department, Thapar University, Patiala 147004, India
Abstract. Feedback via simulation tools is likely to help people improve their decision-making against natural disasters. However, little is known on how differing strengths of experiential feedback and feedback's availability in simulation tools influence people's decisions against landslides. We tested the influence of differing strengths of experiential feedback and feedback's availability on people's decisions against landslides in Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India. Experiential feedback (high or low) and feedback's availability (present or absent) were varied across four between-subject conditions in a tool called the Interactive Landslide Simulation (ILS): high damage with feedback present, high damage with feedback absent, low damage with feedback present, and low damage with feedback absent. In high-damage conditions, the probabilities of damages to life and property due to landslides were 10 times higher than those in the low-damage conditions. In feedback-present conditions, experiential feedback was provided in numeric, text, and graphical formats in ILS. In feedback-absent conditions, the probabilities of damages were described; however, there was no experiential feedback present. Investments were greater in conditions where experiential feedback was present and damages were high compared to conditions where experiential feedback was absent and damages were low. Furthermore, only high-damage feedback produced learning in ILS. Simulation tools like ILS seem appropriate for landslide risk communication and for performing what-if analyses.
Citation: Chaturvedi, P., Arora, A., and Dutt, V.: Learning in an interactive simulation tool against landslide risks: the role of strength and availability of experiential feedback, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 1599-1616, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-1599-2018, 2018.
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Short summary
Landslides are causing serious problems worldwide. To improve the risk communication, a Web-based interactive landslide simulator is used in this study. The ILS tool is based on the assumption that landslides occur due to environmental factors (spatial geology and rainfall) as well as human factors. The ILS also provides feedback in terms of fatality, injury, and property damage due to landslides. Results of an experiment with ILS suggest improved performance with repeated and rich feedback.
Landslides are causing serious problems worldwide. To improve the risk communication, a...
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