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NHESS | Articles | Volume 18, issue 11
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 3007–3018, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-3007-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Special issue: Environmental changes and hazards in the Dead Sea region (NHESS/ACP/HESS/SE...

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 3007–3018, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-3007-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 13 Nov 2018

Research article | 13 Nov 2018

Observations of positive sea surface temperature trends in the steadily shrinking Dead Sea

Pavel Kishcha et al.

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Cited articles

AL-Khlaifat, A.: Dead Sea rate of evaporation, Am. J. Appl. Sci., 5, 934–942, https://doi.org/10.3844/ajassp.2008.934.942, 2008. 
Alpert, P., Shafir, H., and Issahary, D.: Recent changes in the climate of the Dead Sea Valley – A Preliminary Study, Climatic Change, 37, 513–537, https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1005330908974, 1997. 
El-Hallaq, A. and Habboub, M. O.: Using GIS for time series analysis of the Dead Sea from remotely sensing data, Open J. Civ. Eng., 4, 386–396, https://doi.org/10.4236/ojce.2014.44033, 2014. 
Gertman, I. and Hecht, A.: The Dead Sea hydrography from 1992 to 2000, J. Mar. Syst., 35, 169–181, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0924-7963(02)00079-9, 2002. 
Gorelick, N., Hancher, M., Dixon, M., Ilyushchenko, S., Thau, D., and Moore, R.: Google Earth Engine: Planetary-scale geospatial analysis for everyone, Remote Sens. Environ., 202, 18–27, 2017. 
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Short summary
Increasing warming of steadily shrinking Dead Sea surface water was observed during the period of 2000–2016. We found that a positive feedback loop between the steady shrinking of the Dead Sea and positive sea surface temperature (SST) trends causes the acceleration of Dead Sea shrinking. Our findings imply the following essential point: any meteorological, hydrological or geophysical process causing steady shrinking of the Dead Sea will contribute to positive trends in SST.
Increasing warming of steadily shrinking Dead Sea surface water was observed during the period...
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