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Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 18, issue 12
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 3211-3223, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-3211-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 3211-3223, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-3211-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 03 Dec 2018

Research article | 03 Dec 2018

Numerical and remote techniques for operational beach management under storm group forcing

Verónica Morales-Márquez1, Alejandro Orfila1, Gonzalo Simarro2, Lluís Gómez-Pujol3, Amaya Álvarez-Ellacuría1, Daniel Conti1, Álvaro Galán4, Andrés F. Osorio5, and Marta Marcos1,6 Verónica Morales-Márquez et al.
  • 1IMEDEA (UIB-CSIC), Mediterranean Institute of Advanced Studies, St. Miquel Marquès 21, 07190, Esporles, Balearic Islands, Spain
  • 2ICM, Institute of Marine Sciences, Passeig Marítim de la Barceloneta 37-49, 08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
  • 3Earth Sciences Research Group, Department of Biology, University of the Balearic Islands, Ctra. Valldemossa, km 7.5, 07122 Palma, Balearic Islands, Spain
  • 4ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, University of Castilla–La Mancha, Av. Camilo José Cela s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real, Castilla–La Mancha, Spain
  • 5OCEANICOS Research Group, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Cr. 80, 65-223 Medellín, Colombia
  • 6Department of Physics, University of the Balearic Islands, Ctra. Valldemossa km 7.5, 07122 Palma, Balearic Islands, Spain

Abstract. The morphodynamic response of a microtidal beach under a storm group is analyzed, and the effects of each individual event are inferred from a numerical model, in situ measurements and video imaging. The combination of these approaches represents a multiplatform tool for beach management, especially during adverse conditions. Here, the morphodynamic response is examined during a period with a group of three storms. The first storm, with moderate conditions (Hs ∼ 1 m during 6h), eroded the aerial beach and generated a submerged sandbar in the breaking zone. The bar was further directed offshore during the more energetic second event (Hs = 3.5 m and 53h). The third storm, similar to the first one, hardly affected the beach morphology, which stresses the importance of the beach configuration previous to a storm. The volume of sand mobilized during the storm group is around 17.65 m3 m−1. During the following months, which are characterized by mild wave conditions, the aerial beach recovered half of the volume of sand that is transported offshore during the storm group ( ∼ 9.27 m3 m−1). The analysis of beach evolution shows two different characteristic timescales for the erosion and recovery processes associated with the storm and mild conditions, respectively. In addition, the response depends largely on the previous beach morphological state. The work also stresses the importance of using different tools (video monitoring, modeling, and field campaign) to analyze beach morphodynamics.

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This work analyzes the response of a beach under a series of storms using a numerical model, in situ measurements and video imaging. Time recovery after storms is a key issue for local beach managers, who are pressed by tourism stakeholders to nourish the beach after energetic processes in order to reach the quality standards required by beach users.
This work analyzes the response of a beach under a series of storms using a numerical model, in...
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