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Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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NHESS | Articles | Volume 19, issue 8
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 1601–1618, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-1601-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 1601–1618, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-1601-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 05 Aug 2019

Research article | 05 Aug 2019

The effects of changing climate on estuarine water levels: a United States Pacific Northwest case study

Kai Parker et al.
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (14 Jun 2019) by Bruno Merz
AR by Kai Parker on behalf of the Authors (19 Jun 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (21 Jun 2019) by Bruno Merz
RR by Hamed Moftakhari (03 Jul 2019)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (04 Jul 2019) by Bruno Merz
AR by Kai Parker on behalf of the Authors (05 Jul 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Our ability to manage estuaries is currently limited by a poor understanding of how they will evolve into the future. This study explores flooding conditions at two US Pacific estuaries as controlled by changing climate. The hazard is characterized using a variety of models that track oceanic, atmospheric, and hydrologic forcing at decadal scales. It is found that flood surface height varies significantly across estuaries and can be expected to change in complex ways moving into the future.
Our ability to manage estuaries is currently limited by a poor understanding of how they will...
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