Journal cover Journal topic
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.883 IF 2.883
  • IF 5-year value: 3.321 IF 5-year
    3.321
  • CiteScore value: 3.07 CiteScore
    3.07
  • SNIP value: 1.336 SNIP 1.336
  • IPP value: 2.80 IPP 2.80
  • SJR value: 1.024 SJR 1.024
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 81 Scimago H
    index 81
  • h5-index value: 43 h5-index 43
NHESS | Articles | Volume 19, issue 8
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 1601–1618, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-1601-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 1601–1618, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-1601-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 05 Aug 2019

Research article | 05 Aug 2019

The effects of changing climate on estuarine water levels: a United States Pacific Northwest case study

Kai Parker et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 685 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
537 138 10 685 13 12
  • HTML: 537
  • PDF: 138
  • XML: 10
  • Total: 685
  • BibTeX: 13
  • EndNote: 12
Views and downloads (calculated since 07 Jan 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 07 Jan 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 353 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 351 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved (final revised paper)  
No saved metrics found.
Saved (discussion paper)  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed (final revised paper)  
No discussed metrics found.
Discussed (discussion paper)  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 11 Nov 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Our ability to manage estuaries is currently limited by a poor understanding of how they will evolve into the future. This study explores flooding conditions at two US Pacific estuaries as controlled by changing climate. The hazard is characterized using a variety of models that track oceanic, atmospheric, and hydrologic forcing at decadal scales. It is found that flood surface height varies significantly across estuaries and can be expected to change in complex ways moving into the future.
Our ability to manage estuaries is currently limited by a poor understanding of how they will...
Citation