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Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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NHESS | Articles | Volume 19, issue 3
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 679–696, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-679-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 679–696, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-679-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 29 Mar 2019

Research article | 29 Mar 2019

Changes in ground deformation prior to and following a large urban landslide in La Paz, Bolivia, revealed by advanced InSAR

Nicholas J. Roberts et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (04 Feb 2019) by Thomas Glade
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (18 Feb 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (19 Feb 2019) by Thomas Glade
AR by Nicholas Roberts on behalf of the Authors (01 Mar 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
La Paz, Bolivia, experiences frequent damaging landslides. We quantify creep before and after the city’s largest modern landslide using spaceborne InSAR. Creep of ancient landslide deposits increased in rate and extent following failure and extended into adjacent intact materials. Accelerated steady-state creep reflects complex post-failure stress redistribution. Landslide risk in La Paz, which is underlain by many large ancient landslides, may be even greater than previously thought.
La Paz, Bolivia, experiences frequent damaging landslides. We quantify creep before and after...
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