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Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 6, issue 6
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 999–1006, 2006
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-6-999-2006
© Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

Special issue: Tsunamis

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 999–1006, 2006
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-6-999-2006
© Author(s) 2006. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

  30 Nov 2006

30 Nov 2006

Marmara Island earthquakes, of 1265 and 1935; Turkey

Y. Altınok1 and B. Alpar2 Y. Altınok and B. Alpar
  • 1Istanbul University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Geophysics, 34850 Avcilar, Istanbul, Turkey
  • 2Istanbul University, Institute of Marine Sciences and Management, 34116 Vefa, Istanbul, Turkey

Abstract. The long-term seismicity of the Marmara Sea region in northwestern Turkey is relatively well-recorded. Some large and some of the smaller events are clearly associated with fault zones known to be seismically active, which have distinct morphological expressions and have generated damaging earthquakes before and later. Some less common and moderate size earthquakes have occurred in the vicinity of the Marmara Islands in the west Marmara Sea. This paper presents an extended summary of the most important earthquakes that have occurred in 1265 and 1935 and have since been known as the Marmara Island earthquakes. The informative data and the approaches used have therefore the potential of documenting earthquake ruptures of fault segments and may extend the records kept on earthquakes far before known history, rock falls and abnormal sea waves observed during these events, thus improving hazard evaluations and the fundamental understanding of the process of an earthquake.

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