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Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 9, issue 1
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 9, 175–183, 2009
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-9-175-2009
© Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: Extreme events induced by weather and climate change: evaluation,...

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 9, 175–183, 2009
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-9-175-2009
© Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  17 Feb 2009

17 Feb 2009

Potential of historical meteorological and hydrological data for the reconstruction of historical flood events – the example of the 1882 flood in southwest Germany

J. Seidel1, F. Imbery2, P. Dostal3, D. Sudhaus4, and K. Bürger5 J. Seidel et al.
  • 1Institute of Hydraulic Engineering, Department of Hydrology and Geohydrology, Universität Stuttgart, Germany
  • 2Meteorological Institute, University of Freiburg, Germany
  • 3Department of Computer Science, Environmental Modelling Group, University of Mainz, Germany
  • 4Department of Physical Geography, University of Freiburg, Germany
  • 5DUC, Environmental Consulting Agency, Freiburg, Germany

Abstract. This paper presents a hydrometeorological reconstruction of the flood triggering meteorological situation and the simulation of discharges of the flood event of December 1882 in the Neckar catchment in Baden-Württemberg (southwest Germany). The course of the 1882 flood event in the Neckar catchment in southwest Germany and the weather conditions which led to this flood were reconstructed by evaluating the information from various historical sources. From these historical data, daily input data sets were derived for run-off modeling. For the determination of the precipitation pattern at the end of December 1882, the sparse historical data were modified by using a similar modern day precipitation pattern with a higher station density. The results of this run-off simulation are compared with contemporary historical data and also with 1-D hydraulic simulations using the HEC-RAS model.

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