Journal cover Journal topic
Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.281 IF 2.281
  • IF 5-year value: 2.693 IF 5-year 2.693
  • CiteScore value: 2.43 CiteScore 2.43
  • SNIP value: 1.193 SNIP 1.193
  • SJR value: 0.965 SJR 0.965
  • IPP value: 2.31 IPP 2.31
  • h5-index value: 40 h5-index 40
  • Scimago H index value: 73 Scimago H index 73
Volume 9, issue 2 | Copyright

Special issue: LIDAR and DEM techniques for landslides monitoring and...

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 9, 267-287, 2009
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-9-267-2009
© Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  03 Mar 2009

03 Mar 2009

Quantifying discontinuity orientation and persistence on high mountain rock slopes and large landslides using terrestrial remote sensing techniques

M. Sturzenegger and D. Stead M. Sturzenegger and D. Stead
  • Department of Earth Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada

Abstract. This paper describes experience gained in the application of terrestrial digital photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning for the characterization of the structure of high mountain rock slopes and large landslides. A methodology allowing the creation and registration of 3-D models with limited access to high mountain rock slopes is developed and its accuracy verified. The importance of occlusion, ground resolution, scale and reflectivity are discussed. Special emphasis is given to the concept of observation scale and resulting scale bias and its influence on discontinuity characterization. The step-path geometry of persistent composite surfaces and its role in remote sensing measurements are described. An example of combined terrestrial digital photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning applied in the generation of a 3-D model of the South Peak of Turtle Mountain, the location of the Frank Slide, is presented. The advantages gained from the combined use of these techniques and the potential offered through long-range terrestrial digital photogrammetry, using high focal length lenses up to 400 mm is illustrated. Special emphasis is given to the potential of this specific technique, which has to the authors knowledge rarely been documented in the geotechnical literature.

Publications Copernicus
Special issue
Download
Citation
Share